A Note on Gratitude

Published on: March 14, 2019

I wanted to start off this blog post by saying a huge THANK YOU to everyone who has shown us support during our first week of business! We are so beyond grateful for the kind words, great ideas, and positive energy you have been bringing to us each day. From the bottom of our hearts, thank you.

After doing some research on the science of gratitude, I have found that there are numerous benefits to practicing gratitude. Experiencing gratitude on a regular basis will make you happier, healthier, and may even help your career. Unfortunately, gratitude is a skill as well as a personality trait. Studies found that changes occur slowly over time after continuously and intentionally practicing gratitude.

If you were to make double your current income, it could increase your long-term well-being by up to 10%. If you don’t feel up to asking for a raise, start a gratitude journal instead. Journaling for 5 minutes day about the things, events, and people you feel grateful for can ALSO increase your long-term well-being by 10%!  Even better, the gratitude you feel will trigger even more gratitude creating a positive feedback loop. Sign me up!

I often catch myself taking my loved ones for granted and hear others say they do the same. Several studies in gratitude suggest that we can train ourselves to become more social, more appreciative, more kind, and more trusting. These benefits also lend themselves to improving and deepening our relationships with others by helping us become less self-centered. This can even improve your self-esteem because people will be more inclined to help and be kind to you, increasing your social capital. People will notice that you are more in-tune and present; they may even start liking you more.

On a personal level, gratitude makes us more optimistic, reduces materialism, and increases spiritualism. Some studies even suggest that optimism can increase your lifespan up to a few years…The glass is certainly half full. Health-wise, you may find that you’re sleeping better, your immune system has improved, or you have more energy. You may also feel more motivated to exercise!

Check out some of these stats on gratitude (compiled from various studies):

Keeping a gratitude journal caused participants to report 19% more time exercising, 10% less physical pain, 8% more sleep, and 25% increased sleep quality. Even patients with hypertension decreased their systolic blood pressure significantly when instructed to count their blessings each week.

I hope I have inspired you to try keeping a gratitude journal, or at least got you thinking about how you can increase feelings of gratitude in your day to day life. Again, we are so very grateful for all of you!

-Chloe

Sign up for our newsletter!